THE QWERTY KEYBOARD RE-DESIGNED FOR A PHONE

The qwerty keyboard is here to stay - at least on desktop keyboards. Although slightly more efficient keyboard designs have been introduced, the difference isn't enough to justify switching hundreds of millions of hardware keyboards.

But the qwerty keyboard works very badly on a touch-screen mobile phone in portrait mode because the keys are so tiny. Most users touch the wrong key as often as the right one. Several solutions have been proposed with fewer and larger keys, but these solutions are difficult to learn and slow to use because the letters are hard to find or because the user has to swipe in a precise direction or touch the key more than once.

The original QwertyX keyboard design has ten large letter keys and puts all the letters in the familiar qwerty order. If you use a desktop keyboard, you already know where the letters are. Each key tells you how to type its letters. To type the large letter, touch the key. To type the small letter on the upper left, swipe up-left. To type the small letter on the lower right, swipe down-right. It's a little faster to touch than to swipe, so the designer took the letter frequency of the English alphabet into account when deciding which letters should be typed by touching and which should be swiped. Look at the QWE key. We use E five times more often than W and 130 times more often than Q, so E became the touch letter. With the help of a few punctuation marks to stretch things out and a little luck, most of the letters fell into place. Ten of the twelve most-used letters are touch letters, so you touch 71% of the time and swipe only 29%.


The Qwerty5 Keyboard

There are now 5-, 6-, and 7-key-wide variants of the QwertyX keyboard design. The keys are narrower, but you swipe less often. These new designs are better for larger phone screens.

The QwertyX Keyboard design is now available in other styles...

Qwerty5 Keyboard

Qwerty6 Keyboard

Qwerty7 Keyboard


THE QWERTY6 KEYBOARD APP FOR ANDROID

THE WATCH KEYBOARD APP FOR ANDROID

ATTENTION DEVELOPERS

Would you like to use the QwertyX Keyboard Design on your own Android keyboard app?

Free for free apps. Contact us.

The QwertyX Keyboard Design and its variants (including the 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7-key-wide variants) are copyright © 2011-2014 by Ernest Ruckle.

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